5 Fun Science Experiments You Can Do with Easter Candy

Photo by bhofack2 / iStock
Photo by bhofack2 / iStock

Sweet treats are everywhere these days: at the grocery store, at work, and in children’s Easter baskets. But you don’t have to eat all of it: Instead use those marshmallow chicks and jellybeans to help your kids learn a little science.So easy, all you need are candy and items you already have at home! 

1. Dissolving Marshmallow Chicks Experiment

(from www.Momto2PoshLildivas.com)

Materials:

  • Clear glasses/containers
  • Marshmallow chicks
  • Various liquids – water, vinegar, soda, juice, laundry detergent

Instructions:

  1. Brainstorm different liquids that your kids think would dissolve marshmallow chicks.
  2. Fill glass less than half full of the desired liquid.
  3. Place one marshmallow chick in a clear glass with the liquid.
  4. Observe the changes after 1 hr, 3 hrs, 12 hrs, 24 hrs
  5. Try it with gummy bears and other candy!

 Ask some questions!

  • What color does it turns?
  • How long did it take to dissolve?
  • What shape did it turn?
  • What do you think happened to the marshmallow chick?

2. Microwave Marshmallow Chicks Experiment

(from www.Momto2PoshLildivas.com)

Materials:

  • Marshmallow chicks (or other candy)
  • Paper plate
  • Microwave

Instructions:

  1. Place a marshmallow chick on a paper plate in a microwave.
  2. Heat for 30 seconds-1 minute.
  3. Observe the differences between a heated and an unheated marshmallow chick!

Ask some questions!

  • What do you think will happen?
  • Why do you think the marshmallow chick reacted that way? 

3. Sink or Float?

(from www.readingconfetti.com)

Materials:

  • Various mini-size candy bars
  • Tall clear vase/container
  • Water

Instructions:

  1. Gather various mini-sized candy bars, jellybeans, marshmallow chicks, or other candy
  2. Fill a tall clear container with water about ¾ of the way full.
  3. Place one piece of candy into the vase and record or observe what happens.
  4. Repeat for the other candies.

Ask some questions!

  • Why do you think it sank? Float?
  • What’s inside the candy bar?
  • Does it feel heavy? What happened? 

4. Balancing Candies

(from www.inspirationlaboratories.com)

Materials:

  • Plastic hanger
  • String/yarn (24” pieces)
  • Tape
  • Plastic cups
  • Small candies
  • Small toys (i.e., Legos®, mini figurines, toy cars…)

Instructions:

  1. Place plastic hangar on a doorknob
  2. Wrap one end of the string around the top of a plastic cup and tape together.
  3. Attach the other end of the string to the hanger and tape. (Try to tape or tie to the same distance on both sides of the hook. If you hanger has slip hooks, even better!
  4. Place 5 candies in one cup.
  5. Have your child place Lego bricks in the other cup and see how many will equal the weight of the candy.

 Ask some questions!

  • How many Lego bricks do you think weigh as much as the candy? Why?
  • How much do you think the candy weighs?
  • How much do you think 100 candies weigh?

5. Which Candy Dissolves?

(from www.coffeecupsandcrayons.com)

Materials:

  • Clear bowls
  • Water
  • Various small candies (jellybeans, etc.)

Instructions:

Place candies at the bottom of several water bowls and observe what happens. 

Ask some questions!

  • What do you think will happen to the candy?
  • Which color do you think dissolves first? Why?
  • What color do you think the water will turn?
  • Why do you think it’s dissolving?
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