5 Adorable DIY Christmas Ornaments for Kids to Make this Season

Photo by Pixel Stories / Stocksy United / 126729
Photo by Pixel Stories / Stocksy United

Holiday ornaments are such a joy to bring out each winter. Whether you’re the sort that carefully wraps each one in a sheet of tissue paper or more of the “just-chuck-‘em-back-in-the-box” type, ornaments have a way of triggering good memories. Making ornaments can especially evoke feelings of warmth and togetherness, which is why we love the homemade versions best. Make one of these DIY ornaments (or all five!) and you’ll love taking them out of storage for years to come.

1. Yarn-Wrapped Star Ornaments

Trace a star cookie cutter or printed template onto thick paper like cardstock, and then cut out the star with scissors. If you’re feeling especially crafty, cut out two of the same star shapes from a felt sheet, and glue on to the paper star for a cozier look. Have your child choose a color of yarn, then tape one end of the yarn to the star. Help your child hold the string down on the star while they start wrapping the yarn around the star—there’s no wrong way to do it! Let the yarn go in any direction they choose. When your child is happy with the star, knot the end of the yarn and cut it from the roll of yarn, then add a loop of yarn or string to be able to hang the ornament on something.

Photo by Shikhar Bhattarai / Stocksy / 1971541
Photo by Shikhar Bhattarai / Stocksy

2. Handprint Snowflake

Nothing is cuter than tiny hands, and kids will love comparing their baby and toddler handprints to their hands as they get older. For this craft, simply dip your child’s hand in non-toxic white paint and press it onto simple globe ornaments (you can use plastic or metal ornaments to avoid the risk of breaking glass). The white handprints will look like snowflakes on red, blue, or gold ornaments. You can also add some glitter to the paint to give it extra sparkle.

3. Plastic Cup “Stained Glass”

This DIY shrinkable craft completed with Sharpie® markers turns clear plastic Solo cups into colorful disks that look like stained glass. Simply have your child color a clear plastic cup with Sharpies, either in stripes or freestyle, and then place the cups on a baking tray lined with parchment paper or foil sprayed with non-stick oil. Place in a 350 degree oven for three to four minutes. Remove the tray and immediately press the cups down with a spatula (also sprayed with nonstick cooking oil). Watch in amazement as the simple plastic cup transforms into a beautiful ornament before your very eyes! Make a hole with a hole-punch and add a loop of string.

4. Mason-Jar Lid Mini-Wreaths

If you’ve got a stash of canning jars in the cupboard, chances are you have some spare lids floating around. This fun craft uses those spare Mason jar rings and twine or string to make simple, rustic wreath ornaments. If you don’t keep canning jars around the house, you can purchase the jar rings separately for about $10 a pack.

To make a lid mini-wreath, simply knot one end of a long piece of twine or yarn (in any color) around the ring, then wrap the yarn around and around to cover. When it’s fully wrapped, you can use the end of the twine or yarn to make a loop to hang the ornament. Want your wreath more bedazzled? Glue on puff balls, beads, or other decorations for added pizzazz.

5. Rainbow Alphabet Ornaments

This ornament project is a great language activity for preschoolers and kindergarteners, as it helps your child learn colors and letters at the same time! You can either cut printed letters out of heavy paper or purchase ready-cut felt or paper letters from a craft store. Then, let your child paint each letter a different color (or a mix of colors). After they are dry, tape a loop of string to the top of each letter, and help your child spell words with the ornaments. How cute will the words “love,” “Santa,” or the names of your family members (pets included) look hanging from the tree or the window?

Back to top
search instagram facebook twitter pinterest chevron-up chevron-down chevron-right chevron-left title title title title title title title title play